Thursday, March 19, 2009

pre cuppa observations

firstly- i can't think of one good thing that comes out of skiing for pleasure. i understand there was a need for skiing and snowshoeing pre-modern times and still in some remote areas. but the vast majority of skiiers today are pleasure skiiers. i suppose it's like any other risk taking venture but i really think most find it innocuous. it isn't. it has killed many- sony bono leaps to mind and now, natasha richardson. very sad. even sadder- the folks i don't hear about because they aren't rich and famous. unless that's all who can afford to ski these days.

mmmm...... new poll finds that americans fear losing their quality of life. no kidding. so do i- but you adapt and learn to live life anyway. we have to let go of the fear. it is what controls us so that our corporate overlords can keep control overall. what's the cliche?- 'if you love something set it free- if it comes back, it's yours. if not, it wasn't meant to be'- or something like that. look, no one wants to lose their home, car, job, family, etc. it's devastating and stressful and scary. but if you haven't, take the time to let your mind go there and process what you would do if it did happen to you. you may find that your fears are worse than reality and that's the real secret to control.

anyhoo- on to morning cuppa. i ramble more incoherently prior to my 2 cups of the nectar of the gods. namaste.

5 comments:

Brother Tim said...

One of my favorite books from my college days!

"If you love something, set it free; if it comes backs it's yours, if it doesn't, it never was."
~Richard Bach, in Jonathan Livingston Seagull

Dave Dubya said...

Skiing is like most outdoor sports and recreation. It entails some risk of injury. There's always a way for nature, or gravity, to take you down. Mountain climbers know all about the risks of gravity.

Hikers get mauled by bears or cougers.

Then there's "hunting" with Deadeye Dick Cheney.

Football and hockey players get broken all the time.

With every thrill comes risk.

Hmm...maybe certain drugs are safer recreation after all.

Brother Tim said...

I'm going 'Green' for my recreation. I'm puttin in 'bud' with the tomatoes. It will be 'Killing two birds to get stoned' or something like that. B-}

Time said...

Risks taken, lessons learned, life lived.
My brother broke his leg skiing when I was 10. I have never skied. I have never broken a bone in my body.
Some of my friends would tease me because I would not engage in some of their "you have to live life" physical escapades.
I have had friends die because of those escapades.
I am not smarter than most, I just saw the danger in some of those stunts.
My sister sky dives, my brother races cars, my other brother hang glides, good for them. They have all been hurt at some time or another. They continue to engage in those extreme sports, good for them.

HAPPY IN NEVADA said...

Hi - read all the links you provided and your post.

As I also recall, it was a young Kennedy that also died on the slopes; very similar to Sonny Bono (I think his name was Michael).

I used to work for Opinion Research Corporation, so I was interested in the poll results; their sampling was only slightly over 1,000, so that doesn't comprise enough people to give a solid % result.

Nevertheless, I think the overall 'mood' of most, is that the quality of life is 'changing', and not always because of their financial situation being threatened, but the lack of quality health-care; services - inability to get prompt responses to issues they need resolved via telephone when dealing with companies and large state or federal agencies.

When you go to get a prescription and are told they're out of the medication; wait 5 days, and come back then, this is a prime example of a 'change' that makes anyone worry about the quality of life and the standard of living they once enjoyed.

I'm sure you'll have fun with your garden; always loved mine when I had land to plant.

I used to plant my small plants inside plastic shopping bags (with handles); set them out during the day, and if there was any indication of frost, I could bring them in at night very easily.

They were pretty darned big when I'd finally put them in the ground; in fact, some plants can stay in the plastic bags if you put at about 7 inches of good soil in to start with - obviously, putting pebbles or pieces of bark in the bottom to allow for drainage, and poking a few holes in the bottom as well (just don't poke too many so the bag breaks).

Back from the dentist; time to get to my 'reading'...

Diane